Welcome to the Coaches Corner!!! 

Coaching Resources

 

Please have all your current speech and debate students to to this link - http://www.tfaforms.com/347231 - and have them each fill out the form for NAUDL, this is necessary for us to recieve a specific grant. 

 

Teaching Argumentation & Debate: An Educator's Activities Manuel - This document has tons of information for coaching debate made by the National Association of Urban Debate Leagues, there are 9 chapters: Intro to Debate, Intro to the Topic, Speaking, Flowing, Research, Evidence and Writing Briefs, Argumentation, Cross-Examination, and Case Debate. 

How to Hold Effective Recruitment Meetings - This is a good resource for new teams or new coaches who are trying to develop a larger team or just get some new members. 

Contesting Your Opponents EvidenceThis document has some suggestions for how debaters can contest evidence in debate written by Stefan Bauschard who is a coach at both Harvard and Lakeland District Debate. 

Famous Debaters - This is a list of famous people who did debate, this can be used as a recruitment tool.

Guide for Starting a Team - This is a suggested guide on how to start and run a debate team, this document is made by the National Association of Urban Debate Leagues.  

Tongue Twisters - Making your debaters and speech students practice tongue twisters can be a great way to become clearer when speaking in rounds! Check out some of these tongue twisters for your students! 

Public Forum Ballot - This is what our high school level public forum ballot looks like. 

Policy Debate BallotThis is what our high school level policy debate ballot looks like. 

LD Ballot - This is what our high school level LD debate ballot looks like.

25 Flowing Tips - Use these tips to teach your students how to flow! 

 

For evidence for your students check out this link - http://newarkdebateacademy.org/news/blog/72-high-school-evidence-2014-2015 or go to http://www.debatecoaches.org/resources/open-evidence-project/

 

Debate Times and Speech Orders

Policy Debate

In policy debate each of the four students give two speeches and participate in two cross-examination (CX) periods. There are two different types of speeches, the first is what is called a constructive speech, in these speeches students present new arguments and present these arguments using mostly evidence. The second type of speech is a rebuttal speech, in this type of speech there are no new arguments, debaters only rebut their opponent’s arguments from the constructive speeches.

The cross-examination period is a period in which one debater asks one of their opponent’s questions about their speech. CX is a one-way questioning period, meaning one debater asks questions and one debater answers. By the end of the debate each debater has asked questions once and answered questions once.

In policy debate there are also speaker positions, each debater takes on one of these positions. There are four speaker positions:

  • 1A – This is the 1st Affirmative speaker. This person gives the 1AC (1st affirmative constructive) and the 1AR (1st affirmative rebuttal).
  • 2A – This is the 2nd Affirmative speaker. This person gives the 2AC (2nd affirmative constructive) and the 2AR (2nd affirmative rebuttal).
  • 1N – This is the 1st negative speaker. This person gives the 1NC (1st negative constructive) and 1NR (1st negative constructive).
  • 2N – This is the 2nd negative speaker. This person gives the 2NC (2nd negative constructive) and the 2NR (2nd negative rebuttal).


The speech times and order in policy debate is as follows:

SPEECH

TIME

1AC

8 Minutes

CX of the 1AC (answers questions) done by the 2N (asks questions)

3 Minutes

1NC

8 Minutes

CX of 1NC done by the 1A

3 Minutes

2AC

8 Minutes

CX of 2AC done by the 1N

3 Minutes

2NC

8 Minutes

CX of 2NC done by 2A

3 Minutes

1NR

5 Minutes

1AR

5 Minutes

2NR

5 Minutes

2AR

5 Minutes

In policy debate each team gets preparation time, they may use this time at any point in the debate. In the Newark Debate Academy each team gets 8 minutes of preparation, at some tournaments in different places in the country preparation time may be 5, 8, or 10 minutes. 

 

 

Public Forum

In Public Forum there are two sides. There is the pro who argues for the resolution and then the con who argues against the resolution. Unlike policy debate, in public forum arguments like formalized plans, counterplans, and kritiks are not allowed.

The Coin Toss - In public forum unlike the other debate events before the round begins there is a coin flip. Whichever team wins the coin flip can choose one of two things. They can either choose which side they will argue pro or con. Or they may choose which speaker order the want, they can either choose to be the first team who speaks or the second team who speaks.

  • For example, if team A wins the coin flip they could chose to go pro. If team A chooses the side then team B can choose if they want to go first or second. So the team who loses the coin toss still gets some decisions about the round.

 

The Speeches in Public Forum:

There are 4 speakers in each PF round. Speaker 1 and 3 are on the same team and speaker 2 and 4 are on the same team.

SPEECH

TIME

Constructive – Speaker 1

4 Minutes

Constructive – Speaker 2

4 Minutes

Crossfire – between Speakers 1 & 2

3 Minutes

Rebuttal – Speaker 3

4 Minutes

Rebuttal – Speaker 4

4 Minutes

Crossfire – between Speakers 3 & 4

3 Minutes

Summary – Speaker 1

2 Minutes

Summary – Speaker 2

2 Minutes

Grand Crossfire – all debaters

3 Minutes

Final Focus – Speaker 3

2 Minutes

Final Focus – Speaker 4

2 Minutes

 

Constructive Speeches – There is both a pro and a con constructive. In these speeches both teams “construct” their arguments for the rounds. For the pro they present major reasons why the resolution is true and the con provides major reasons why the resolution is not true. 

Rebuttal Speeches – In these speeches both teams must rebut the arguments presented in the constructive speeches. In many rounds debaters will also use some of this speech time to rebuild their own case, specifically this often happens when the team is second. New arguments and evidence may be presented in these speeches.

Summary Speeches – In this speech new evidence may be presented but new arguments should not be presented unless it is in refutation to one of your opponent’s earlier arguments in the rebuttal. This speech should have a brief overview on each key argument in the debate and try to summarize/wrap up each individual argument. Because this speech is only two minutes it is important for debaters to try to condense down the debate into fewer arguments and not try to argue too much.

Final Focus – In these speeches debaters should explain to the judge why they should win the debate, this can be done by idetifying the key arguments in the debate. No new arguments should be presented in this speech. Once again because it is a shorter speech it is important to condense down the debate and not extend too many arguments.

Crossfire – Debaters have a back and forth questioning period. Both debaters ask and answer questions within the crossfire period. In the first two crossfires only the two corresponding speakers may participate. The first question typically is asked by the team who had spoken first. In grand crossfire all four debaters participate. 

Prep Time – In public forum each team gets two minutes of prep time for the round. This serves as a running clock and the team may use it whenever they choose. 



Lincoln-Douglas Debate

The speech times are as follows in LD: 

SPEECH

TIME

Affirmative Constructive

6 Minutes

Cross-Examination (Neg asks questions, aff answers)

3 Minutes

Negative Constructive

7 Minutes

Cross–Examination (Aff asks questions, neg answers)

3 Minutes

1st Affirmative Rebuttal

4 Minutes

Negative Rebuttal

6 Minutes

2nd Affirmative Rebuttal

3 Minutes

 

In LD debate the constructive speeches just build the arguments for the debates. The affirmative constructive gives reasons as to why they support the resolution, and the negative constructive builds their own case as why we should reject the resolution and also begins to rebut the affirmative constructive. Often the constructive is also referred to as a “case” so often the affirmative constructive is known as the affirmative case or AC.

Cross examination in LD is a one way questioning – the debater who just finished speaking only answers questions while the other debater asks all the questions.

In LD there is a preparation time that you may use at any point in the debate before any of your own speeches. In LD depending on the tournament prep time may range from 4 to 5 minutes. It functions as a running down clock, so for instance if the negative uses all 5 minutes for their constructive they would then have no prep time for their rebuttal.

The Value - In the majority of LD cases there is the value. This part of your case identifies what you believe the goal of the resolution should be. This part of your case should explain what values the judge should prioritize, this makes the comparison easier for the judge when a topic may be difficult. For instance if we look at the organ procurement topic, the affirmative might argue that the value of life to a person who may need the organ should come first, while the negative might argue the autonomy of the dead should come first. So the values would be life versus autonomy.

The Standard/Criterion – Along with the value, there is the standard/criterion that is explained in the constructive speeches as well. This provides the judge a way to frame the round and a way to make their decision, the criterion tells the judge which arguments are most important. Typically it provides a “rule” that the agent of action must follow. For example a possible standard/criterion could be “a just government must ensure the welfare of its poorest citizens.”